It’s SALE time!!!

I have too much gear… time to rationalise and consolidate. If you are interested in any of the items listed feel free to send me message.

Fuji X-E1 + 35mm Lens

Both in perfect condition. I will separate, but prefer to sell as a kit. Includes a B+W lens filter & all original boxes and packaging.

Fuji X-E1

Olympus 2,8/12-40mm Pro Lens

As much I like this lens it is actually me least used lens. It is only 3 or 4 months old and I have the original box and packaging. I will will also include a B+W lens filter.

Olympus OM-D E-M1 & 2,8/12-40mm Pro Lens

Sigma 2,8/60mm Lens (MFT Mount)

This is an awesome lens but I own the Olympus 1,8/75mm lens and the Sigma lens simply doesn’t get used. Includes all original packaging.

Sigma 2,8/60mm

Olympus v. Fuji v. Sony (Part 4)

PART 4 – High ISO Comparison

The following images were shot in near darkness except for the light produced by the MacBook’s display. The Fuji X-T1 had difficulty locking focus so my options were to either focus manually or use the backlit keyboard as the focus point. I chose the keyboard as the focus point for each of the cameras. Incidentally both the Olympus and the Sony had no difficulty locking focus anywhere within the frame.

I also tried to keep the composition of the images as similar as possible by using similar equivalent focal lengths (Fuji X-T1 & Carl Zeiss Touit Planar T* 1,8/32mm, Olympus OM-D E-M1 & Olympus 2,8/12-40mm, Sony A7s & Carl Zeiss Sonnar T* 1,8/55mm). All images were shot with the camera on a tripod in Aperture Priority mode.

I know they are not the most exciting of images but at least you can seen the ISO performance of each camera under the exact same conditions. All of the images are straight of of camera with out any noise reduction applied

Below are the images from ISO 1600 up to each of the cameras’ maximum ISO. If you wish to see the same images at lower ISO’s click HERE to see the Flickr Set.

Here are links to Parts 1, 2 & 3 of this shoot-out:

PART 1 – Olympus OM-D E-M1

PART 2 – Fuji X-T1

PART 3 – Sony A7s

Sony A7s @ ISO 1600
Sony A7s @ ISO 1600

Fuji X-T1 @ ISO 1600
Fuji X-T1 @ ISO 1600

Olympus OM-D E-M1 @ ISO 1600
Olympus OM-D E-M1 @ ISO 1600

Sony A7s @ ISO 3200
Sony A7s @ ISO 3200

Fuji X-T1 @ ISO 3200
Fuji X-T1 @ ISO 3200

Olympus OM-D E-M1 @ ISO 3200
Olympus OM-D E-M1 @ ISO 3200

Sony A7s @ ISO 6400
Sony A7s @ ISO 6400

Olympus OM-D E-M1 @ ISO 6400
Olympus OM-D E-M1 @ ISO 6400

Sony A7s @ ISO 12800
Sony A7s @ ISO 12800

Fuji X-T1 @ ISO 12800
Fuji X-T1 @ ISO 12800

Olympus OM-D E-M1 @ ISO 12800
Olympus OM-D E-M1 @ ISO 12800

Sony A7s @ ISO 25600
Sony A7s @ ISO 25600

Fuji X-T1 @ ISO 25600
Fuji X-T1 @ ISO 25600

Olympus OM-D E-M1 @ ISO 25600
Olympus OM-D E-M1 @ ISO 25600

Sony A7s @ ISO 40000
Sony A7s @ ISO 40000

Sony A7s @ ISO 51200
Sony A7s @ ISO 51200

Sony A7s @ ISO 64000
Sony A7s @ ISO 64000

Sony A7s @ ISO 80000
Sony A7s @ ISO 80000

Sony A7s @ ISO 102400
Sony A7s @ ISO 102400

Sony A7s @ ISO 204800
Sony A7s @ ISO 204800

Sony A7s @ ISO 409600
Sony A7s @ ISO 409600

Olympus v. Fuji v. Sony (Part 3)

PART 3 – Sony A7s

Firstly let me apologise for taking longer than expected to get this part of the review on-line. I actually had a phone call today from a reader of my Blog who had been waiting for this review before deciding whether or not to buy one… So this is for you Peter!

Sony A7s & Zeiss Sonnar T* 1,8/55

I have been extremely busy with work commitments lately, which also means I have had limited time to get out and shoot what I want with this camera. Unfortunately apart from being able to compare the test images with the Olympus OM-D E-M1 and the Fuji X-T1 my commentary is going to be little less in depth than that of the other two cameras.

I mentioned in previous posts why I decided to add this camera to my kit, and it was probably more a case of WANT than NEED. There was something about the images that were special and with the low light capabilities of the Sony A7s I envisioned many creative opportunities presenting themselves that simply wouldn’t be possible with my other cameras. Time will tell whether or not this is actually the case or I am simply trying to justify my purchase. Either way from my short time with the Sony A7s I am very very impressed with this camera.

Images shot at ISO 3200 on this camera look like images shot at ISO 200 or 400 on most other cameras and never before have I been comfortable shooting at ISO 25600 and beyond. On the Fuji, ISO 3200 is acceptable and at a push ISO 6400 gets the job done. With the Olympus I generally wouldn’t shoot at anything over ISO 1600. The other amazing thing about the Sony is that even at high ISO’s the “noise” in the image looks more like film grain than noise, where as high ISO images shot with Fuji and the Olympus look more like digital noise. There is also much less of a colour shift with the Sony and far more detail is retained in the image.

Here are a couple of “behind the scenes” images taken at ISO 10000. Yes 10000! If you click on the black and white image below and view at full size, zoom into the LCD display on the camera to see how much detail is retained. It is nothing short of amazing.

Behind the Scenes with the Sony A7s @ ISO 10000

Behind the Scenes with the Sony A7s @ ISO 10000

I will do a high ISO comparison for Part 4 of this review to give you an idea of the real differences between the 3 cameras.

What is also impressive is the Sony’s ability to lock focus in near darkness. Where as the Olympus has blazing fast auto-focus, even in low light, there comes a point when the E-M1 starts to struggle.

The other appealing feature of this camera (for me) is Sony’s relationship with Carl Zeiss. It is one of the few things that I miss since giving up my Sony DSLR. I can now shoot with both native FE-mount Zeiss glass or with Sony A-mount (DLSR) Zeiss glass via a Sony adapter (and still retain full autofocus capabilities).

The Sony A7s also has enormous dynamic range. Sony claim over 14 stops of “useable” dynamic range which is up there with the best if the best. In video tests I have read online it ranked a close second to a $40,000 Arri Amira cinema camera for usable dynamic range.

This is Sony’s video showing the low light capabilities of the camera for those of you who are interested.

I am a “still” photographer, but for those of you out there who shoot video I should probably mention that the Sony A7s is capable of shooting 4K video as well. My knowledge of video formats, codecs, frame rates etc is extremely limited, but there is plenty of information out there in relation to the Sony’s video capabilities.

Sony’s lens line up at the moment is a little bit lacking, and based on my shooting requirements I decided to pick up the Carl Zeiss Sonnar T* 1,8/55mm and the Sony G 4/70-200mm OSS. There are a couple of other lenses currently available (Carl Zeiss Sonnar T* 2,8/35 & Carl Zeiss Vario-Tessar T* 4/24-70 OSS) but these don’t really suit my shooting style. I am hoping Sony announce some new lenses at Photokina next month. What I am really hoping for is that they announce a release date of the rumoured Zeiss FE 85mm lens. If this turns out not to be true I will probably opt for the Sony A-mount Zeiss Planar T* 1,4/85 and/or the Zeiss Sonnar T* 1,8/135 (and use the Sony adapter)

When you buy this camera Sony offers you choice of adapters so you can use existing lenses from other systems. You can choose a Leica M, Nikon ZF, Canon ZE or Sony A-mount adapter. I chose the Sony A-Mount and I also have (from when I owned a Sony NEX-7) a Leica M-mount adapter. At the moment I don’t own any M-mount glass but given the fact that I am also able to adapt M-mount glass to the Olympus and Fuji I am considering experimenting with a few Voigtlander and Zeiss M-mount lenses.

When I first picked up the camera I immediately noticed the build quality was better than I expected. It was also heavier than expected. I thought it would be about the same weight as the Fuji but it feels a little heavier. The materials make the Sony A7s feel like a premium product, and not a plastic toy, like so many another cameras feel. Even some of the high-end DLSR’s feel cheaply made these days.

I also chose to add the vertical battery grip to the camera for a couple of reasons. One for battery life and the other for ease of handling. It actually makes the camera feel a little more comfortable (especially with the 70-200 lens) and although it increases its weight and bulk it fits my small girl-like hands perfectly.

Carl Zeiss Sonnar T* 1,8/55
The Zeiss Sonnar lens design is one of my favourite lens designs. It was designed in 1929 and the name “Sonnar” is derived from the German word “Sonne”, meaning sun. The sun association was used to emphasise the lens’ large aperture and that remains true today with modern Zeiss Sonnar lenses.

Sony A7s & Zeiss Sonnar T* 1,8/55

Even though I haven’t had that much time to shoot with this camera, the 55mm Zeiss lens is astounding. I would have liked to see a F/1,4 or even a F/1,2 lens but the reality is the weight and size would have made this lens terribly impractical and I think the F/1,8 is a sensible compromise. The lens is lightweight, well built, and feels perfectly balanced on the Sony A7s. Optically it is superb… probably one of the best lenses I have ever used. I also like how the lens looks mounted to the camera (if that makes a difference). The autofocus is fast, accurate and silent and I really can’t find any fault with it. If anyone owns, or is considering buying any A7 variant this lens is highly recommended. I will also add that this lens does exhibit the classic Zeiss look.

Carl Zeiss Sonnar T* 1,8/55
Sony A7s & Zeiss Sonnar T* 1,8/55

Sony A7s & Zeiss Sonnar T* 1,8/55

Sony A7s & Zeiss Sonnar T* 1,8/55

Sony A7s & Zeiss Sonnar T* 1,8/55

Sony G 4/70-200mm OSS
As most of you know I am not a fan of zoom lenses and I have never really been a fan of Sony G lenses. The reason I picked up this lens was so I could have a camera that I could actually use. I thought sticking with one lens would be rather limiting given that I earn living with my cameras.

Sony G 4/70-200 OSS

I was a bit skeptical about outlaying my hard earned money for this lens but unfortunately there was not choice. It’s a zoom, its a G lens and it only has constant F/4 aperture. I do understand why Sony opted for an F/4 lens over an F/2,8 and I agree it was a sensible decision to keep the size and weight down. It’s actually comfortable to shoot with and with a camera that can shoot at high ISO levels, its very easy to make up that extra stop. I am actually very impressed with this lens. The stabilisation is pretty good, it has a focus limiting switch to increase the focus speed, which is already quick and the images it produces are far better than expected. I actually thought this lens would be a stop-gap measure until Sony release some more “desirable” lenses but I can actually see myself shooting with this lens regularly.

Sony G 4/70-200mm OSS @85mm
Sony A7s & Sony G 4/70-200 OSS

Sony G 4/70-200mm OSS @135mm
Sony A7s & Sony G 4/70-200 OSS

Sony G 4/70-200mm OSS @200mm
Sony A7s & Sony G 4/70-200 OSS

Sony G 4/70-200mm OSS @200mm
Sony A7s & Sony G 4/70-200 OSS

Sony G 4/70-200mm OSS
Sony A7s & Sony G 4/70-200 OSS

Sony G 4/70-200mm OSS
Sony A7s & Sony G 4/70-200 OSS

I am considering adding the Zeiss Sonnar T* 2,8/35mm to the kit. This is currently the widest prime lens Sony offers and while this is not a focal length I would normally shoot I do want something a bit wider. I am also extremely tempted because Sony Australia are offering some enormous rebates on selected cameras and lenses. I am just not sure whether to not I can justify the spend. I am almost hoping that when I phone the camera store tomorrow they tell me they are out of stock!

PART 4 – High ISO comparison (should be live this weekend)

PART 1 – Olympus OM-D E-M1

PART 2 – Fuji X-T1

Olympus v. Fuji v. Sony (Part 2)

PART 2 – Fuji X-T1

When I actually decided to make the move exclusively to mirrorless cameras I started looking for a camera system that would compliment my Olympus kit. Whilst doing my research it was the unique look of the Fuji images that kept catching my eye. My first Fuji was an X-E1, and despite all of its shortcomings, and there are a few, the images it produced were something that I fell in love with. It’s difficult to explain but they have a very “non-digital” organic look to them, if that makes sense. So when Fuji announced the X-T1 and released the specs I immediately ordered one, along with the  just announced Fuji 1,2/56mm lens.

Fuji X-T1

When I bought my X-E1 the only lens I picked up was the Fuji 1,4/35mm. Fuji lenses are nothing short of spectacular, and like the Olympus MFT lenses, they have been designed specifically for the Fuji’s X-Trans CMOS sensor. The Fuji 1,4/35mm lens would have to be one of the sharpest 35mm lenses I have ever used, and with that unique Fuji “look” this camera/lens combination is capable of producing some great images.

It wasn’t that long after buying the X-E1 that the X-T1 arrived. I didn’t notice great deal of difference (if any at all) in terms of Image Quality but the X-T1 is a far more user friendly camera. I know many Fuji shooters dislike the design of the X-T1 preferring the retro rangefinder style of the X-Pro 1, X-E1 and X-E2, but I prefer the ergonomics of the X-T1.

Fuji X-E1 & X-T1

The X-T1 fast became my favourite camera of all time. I know it has its shortcomings, as many people keep pointing out, but every camera has its flaws and there isn’t a camera out there that is perfect. I love the way it feels in hand, the weight and balance, the controls, the amazing EVF and most importantly the look and feel of the images it produces.

Some of my all time favourite images have been made with this camera and pretty much from the moment I started shooting with the Fuji X-T1 (and the Olympus OM-D E-M1) I have never once regretted making the move to mirrorless cameras.

I mentioned in Part 1 that the MFT lens line up is one of the most mature and comprehensive of the mirrorless segment. The Fuji lens line up, although not as mature is still remarkably good. It has lenses for pretty much all shooting situations and Fuji are also continually developing new lenses. In terms of optics, the Fuji lenses would have be some of the best in the business. My favourite lens is the Fuji 1,2/56mm (85mm equivalent) which is perfect for my portrait work. With a max aperture of F/1,2 I am able to get pretty much the same DOF control as I would on a full frame DSLR. I regularly shoot wide open the images are spectacular. Its sharp wide open and the out of focus areas (or Bokeh) are smooth and creamy. This is one of my favourite lenses of all time.

Fuji 1,2/56mm

The other lenses I own are the Fuji 2,8/14mm, Carl Zeiss Touit Planar T* 1,8/32mm, Fuji 1,4/35mm, Fuji 1,2/56mm, and Fuji 3,5-4,8/55-200mm Zoom. I have mentioned many times that I am not a fan of zooms and my relationship with the 55-200 is a love hate one. I tried this lens a while ago and after 3 days, and out of frustration, ended up returning it to the store. I now own it again and have decided to try to overlook its shortcomings and spend some time learning how to extract the most out of it. As with all Fuji lenses it produces beautiful images, so until something better comes along it will stay in my kit.

The other decision I have to make is between the Carl Zeiss Touit Planar T* 1,8/32mm and the Fuji 1,4/35mm. I feel it’s a bit redundant to have 2 lenses of such close focal length. Its no secret that I am a fan of Zeiss lenses but both these lenses are so close in performance I am having a hard time deciding which to keep.

For this shootout I used all of the above lenses except for the wide angle 2,8/14mm. It was simply too wide. But for those who are interested to see what the 14mm is capable of here are a few images shot with that particular lens.

Fuji X-E1 & 2,8/14mm

Botany Bay

Woronora Bridge

Bradley's Head Lighthouse

In terms of shooting with the X-T1 I hear lots of complaints about the speed of the auto-focus (among other things). For most of what I shoot the auto-focus is more than up to the task and I have even had good success with moving objects. Where it does cause a bit of a problem is in very low light, and the speed of the auto-focus also depends on which lens is being used. The Fuji 55-200 is terribly slow in low light conditions and continually hunts. When I shot with it in the studio I was forced to use the modelling lights on my strobes so it would lock focus. All other lenses were fine and I think out of the lenses that I do have the 56mm is the fastest and is also pretty good in low light situations. However If I need to shoot in ultra low light, or need super fast response times I use the Olympus (or now the Sony A7s)

Carl Zeiss Touit Planar T* 1,8/32mm & Fuji 1,4/35mm
Although not quite as fast as the Fuji lens I still ever so slightly prefer the look of the images shot with the Zeiss Lens. Many reviews claim that it doesn’t exhibit the classic Zeiss look, but I think it does, especially when compared side by side with the Fuji lens. I also prefer the way the actual lens looks and feels. How a lens feels in hand is a big part of the pleasure of shooting, especially for those of us who are passionate photographers. Don’t misunderstand me, the Fuji 35mm is an amazing lens, and as I said earlier probably one of the sharpest 35mm lenses I have ever used.

Fuji X-T1 & Zeiss Planar T* 1,8/32

In my opinion, 50mm (equivalent) is not the ideal focal length for portraits. I much prefer my portraits shot at around 85mm (equivalent), or more. You will notice the distortion in the images below and while many people shoot portraits with a 50mm lens, I prefer not to unless I don’t have the room to shoot with something longer. Having said that, I will shoot with at 50mm when shooting full length portraits or more environmental type portraits. I have also included an environmental portrait shot with the Fuji 35mm (and X-E1).

Carl Zeiss Touit Planar T* 1,8/32mm
Fuji X-T1 & Zeiss Planar T* 1,8/32

Fuji 1,4/35mm
Fuji X-T1 & Fuji 1,4/35

Fuji 1,4/35mm
Project 50 #35 - Sydney Harbour

Fuji 1,4/35mm
Fuji X-T1 + 1,4/35mm

Fuji 1,4/35mm
Trent

Fuji 1,2/56mm
This is one of my all time favourite lenses. It feels perfectly balanced on the X-T1 and produces images that really exaggerate the Fuji look that I have fallen in love with, especially when shot with wider apertures. It is a stellar portrait lens but is also capable of so much more.

Fuji X-T1 with Battery Grip

I have included some additional images to the test shots showing it used at F/1.2 for portraits as well as for other applications. There is really not too much more to say about this lens except if you own a Fuji X-series camera this is the one lens that you MUST have.

Fuji 1,2/56mm
Fuji X-T1 & Fuji 1,2/56

Fuji 1,2/56mm
Fuji 1,2/56mm

Fuji 1,2/56mm
Fuji 1,2/56mm

Fuji 1,2/56mm Wide Open
Esther

Fuji 1,2/56mm
Esther

Fuji 1,2/56mm
Rafa

Fuji 1,2/56mm
Esther

Fuji 1,2/56mm
Esther

Fuji 1,2/56mm
Schanae

Fuji 1,2/56mm
Schanae

Fuji 55-200mm
As I mentioned earlier my relationship with this lens is a love hate one. My first experience with this lens was, to say the least, disappointing. Part of that was my expectations and my impatience, but it was slow to focus and I thought it really didn’t suit my style of photography.

Fuji X-T1 & 55-200

I never really considered using this lens for portraiture but as it turns out it is actually a remarkably good portrait lens, especially when you want to use longer focal lengths to isolate your subject. The out of focus areas (or Bokeh) are smooth and creamy. I shot at various focal lengths with this lens so you can see the differences. I have also included some additional images shot with this lens, both portrait and other. It still exhibits the traditional Fuji look and I am slowly learning to accept this lens for what it is… an extremely well priced and capable telephoto zoom lens. It’s a keeper.

Fuji 55-200mm @55mm (85mm equivalent)
Fuji X-T1 & 55-200

Fuji 55-200mm @100mm (150mm equivalent)
Fuji X-T1 & 55-200

Fuji 55-200mm @135mm (200mm equivalent)
Fuji X-T1 & 55-200

Fuji 55-200mm @200mm (300mm equivalent)
Fuji X-T1 & 55-200

Fuji 55-200mm @200mm (300mm equivalent)
Fuji X-T1 & 55-200

Fuji 55-200mm
Fuji X-T1 & 55-200

Fuji 55-200mm
Fuji X-T1 & 55-200

Fuji 55-200mm
Fuji X-T1 & 55-200

Fuji 55-200mm
Fuji X-T1 & 55-200

Now to Part 3… the Sony A7s

Back to Part 1 – Olympus OM-D E-M1

Olympus v. Fuji v. Sony (Part 1)

PART 1 – Olympus OM-D E-M1

Having 3 camera systems seems a bit superfluous and given the fact that I love the Fuji X-T1 and the Sony A7s is the new toy I was worried I would no longer have the desire to shoot with the Olympus OM-D E-M1. But unlike the last time when the Fuji X-T1 arrived and I made a snap decision to sell this camera (and regretted it) I thought this time around I would consider my decision a little more carefully. At the time of writing this and having just done a couple of shoots with the Olympus OM-D E-M1 I have decided it’s a keeper!!!

Olympus 1,8/75mm

It was the Olympus OM-D E-M1 that was the catalyst for my move to mirrorless cameras. It really made me think about if a really needed a DSLR and I evidently came to the conclusion that I didn’t.

The Olympus OM-D E-M1 is an absolute pleasure to shoot with and despite having a smaller Micro Four Thirds (MFT) sensor this camera is capable of producing stunning images. I actually used the camera for 2 shoots last weekend and I couldn’t fault it. It does everything you ask of it and more.

The reality is that I can comfortably and confidently shoot most of my commercial work with the Olympus OM-D E-M1. It is simply that good.

The spec sheet reads like that of Nikon’s flagship D4s or Canon’s 1DX (except for the sensor size). It will shoot at 10FPS (with a 50 image buffer), is fully weather sealed, has a flash sync speed of 1/320s, and the build quality is as good as I have seen. It has blazing fast auto-focus, the best image stabilisation I have ever used, is lightweight and easy to handle and is a joy to shoot with all day long. People complain about the controls and dials but I find them extremely easy to use.

I have said all of this before and at the risk of sounding like an advertisement for Olympus I can’t find any real faults with this camera. The MFT system has one of the most extensive lens line ups of any camera system currently available on the market. The lenses are extremely well priced and offer outstanding image quality. They have been designed from scratch specifically to match the MFT digital sensor.

I own a very limited selection of lenses but each and everyone of them produces stellar results and continues to impress me. You are also not limited to Olympus lenses but you can also use Panasonic’s range of lenses and Sigma also offers a selection MFT lenses. Your options don’t stop there. Voigtlander offer a range of native MFT mount manual focus F/0.95 lenses and you can also (as with all mirrorless cameras) adapt pretty much any lens you want. It is an unbelievably versatile camera system.

Here is a list of the lenses I used on the Olympus OM-D E-M1 for the shootout:

Olympus 1,8/25mm (50mm equivalent)
Olympus 1,8/45mm (90mm equivalent)
Olympus 2,8/12-40mm (24-80mm equivalent)
Olympus 1,8/75mm (150mm equivalent)

My least favourite lens is the 2,8/12-40 zoom (I am not generally a fan of zoom lenses) but to be fair I did include it in the shootout because it does offer the advantage of being versatile in terms of focal length and it is also fully weather sealed.

Olympus OM-D E-M1 & 2,8/12-40mm Pro Lens

Despite my love of this camera there are disadvantages of a smaller sensor. One is “Depth of Field” control and the bigger problem is the 2x crop factor. In order to get an equivalent focal length of 50mm you have to shoot with a 25mm lens. This means that you end up with some of the characteristics of a pretty wide angle lens as opposed to a “normal” lens. You can minimise the effects of this by carefully composing your image and framing your subject. I did the exact opposite in some of the shots to exaggerate the shortcomings of this camera. You will notice some distortion in the shots with 25mm Olympus, 32mm Zeiss and 35mm Fuji lenses. Once you get above these focal lengths distortion becomes less of an issue. I actually shot up to an equivalent of 300mm with one of the Fuji lenses.

My subject was a model I had shot with on many occasions in the past she is great to work with. She has worked with me on everything from equipment reviews/tests (such as this one), to fashion shoots and more recently on a Bodyscapes project.

Olympus 2,8/12-40mm Pro Zoom
As mentioned earlier I am not a fan of zoom lenses. If there was a lens I had to part with this would be the first to go. I am not saying it is a bad lens (because it is quite the opposite) but I simply don’t get along with it. I have also included a landscape photo which was shot at 12mm.

Olympus 2,8/12-40mm @12mm
Sydney Harbour

Olympus 2,8/12-40mm @25mm
Olympus OM-D E-M1 & 2,8/12-40

Olympus 2,8/12-40mm @40mm
Olympus OM-D E-M1 & 2,8/12-40

Olympus 1,8/25mm
This is a 50mm equivalent lens and I love it. It is compact, lightweight and produces amazing images.

Olympus 1,8/25mm

I did own the Panasonic Leica 1,4/25mm for a while but I actually prefer the Olympus version. It feels better balanced on the camera, is smaller and lighter, is some 30% cheaper to buy, is tack sharp wide open, and the in my opinion the image quality is just as good, and in some circumstances is actually better.

Olympus 1,8/25mm

Olympus OM-D E-M1 & 1,8/25

Panasonic Leica 1,4/25mm
Gone Fishing

Panasonic Leica 1,4/25mm
Sunrise

Olympus 1,8/45mm
This is another awesome lens from Olympus. It is the perfect focal length for portraits (35mm equivalent of 90mm), and as with the 25mm lens, is tack sharp wide open, fast to focus and never misses a shot. It is not much bigger than the Olympus 25mm and about the same weight and price. Apart from this shootout I recently photographed part of my Bodyscapes project with this lens as well as a Puppy Portrait Shoot. If you own (or are buying) a MFT camera this is a lens that should be on your shopping list.

Olympus 1,8/45mm

Olympus OM-D E-M1 & 1,8/45

If you have deep pockets and don’t want to compromise you can also take a look at the Panasonic Leica 1,2/42.5 Noctitron. I have not yet had the pleasure of using the Noctitron but all reports suggest that this lens is about as good as it gets. Unfortunately it is about 4 times the price of the Olympus 45mm. I love fast lenses but find the cost hard to justify.

Olympus 1,8/45mm

Bodyscapes

Olympus 1,8/45mm
Puppy Portrait

Olympus 1,8/75mm
This is probably Olympus’ best lens currently on offer and one of the best MFT lenses available (except perhaps for the Noctitron). I actually sold this lens the last time I regrettably toyed with the idea of getting rid of my Olympus but I missed it so much I ended up buying another one. The only problem some people have with this lens is the 150mm equivalent focal length. I find this focal length perfect for portraits and head shots and it is also sometimes handy to have a fast compact 150mm lens available. As with the other Olympus offerings the autofocus is blazing fast and accurate. The focal length of this lens gives back some of that Depth of Field control you lose with the shorter focal length lenses on the smaller sensor.

Olympus 1,8/75mm

Olympus OM-D E-M1 & 1,8/75

Olympus 1,8/75mm
Bodyscapes

Olympus 1,8/75mm
Bodyscapes

Olympus 1,8/75mm
Seagull

Olympus 1,8/75mm
Taking it easy
Now to Part 2… the Fuji X-T1.